#No existe (casi) tal cosa como bloqueo de escritor. Si es que lo hay, esto te curará

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En este artículo de Micah Solomon, There’s (Almost) No Such Thing as Writer’s Block. If There is, This’ll Cure Ya.  publicado en: http://blog.bookbaby.com/2016/06/theres-no-such-thing-as-writers-block/  nos habla sobre el terrible bloqueo de escritor y qué técnicas podemos utilizar para erradicarlo.

Not long ago, the concept of writer’s block didn’t even exist. But once the term was created in 1947 by psychoanalyst Edmund Bergler, those of us who write glommed on to it like nobody’s business.

Before I go any further, I want to be clear: Serious psychological issues can make it very difficult to write, and I don’t mean to trivialize these (nor am I qualified to address them). Sadness, fatigue, physical pain, and substance abuse can get in the way of being able to write, and this post won’t address these either. Finally, when parts of a writer’s life are in deep disarray, it can be hard to compartmentalize writing and get down to business as an author, and I certainly don’t have a complete solution for this, either. But if your blockage problem is less deep-seated, this advice might help you kick your writer’s block out of the way.

Let me put it this way.

You don’t get “eater’s block.” You’re either hungry enough to eat or you’re not.

You don’t get “pushups block.” You’re either motivated to drop and give yourself twenty or you’re not.

You don’t get “mopper’s block.” Either mopping the kitchen is worth doing now or it’s not, and if it’s not, you’re consciously choosing to do something else with your time.

Which brings me to the thing about writer’s block. To the extent that the phenomenon even exists, it’s a highly unhelpful concept for those of us who are authors.

Not too many years ago, the concept of writer’s block didn’t even exist, at least not exactly. But once the term was created in 1947 by psychoanalyst Edmund Bergler, and the concept popularized, those of us who write – or need a reason not to – glommed on to it like nobody’s business.

No longer were we lazy, unmotivated, fearful, etc. We were “blocked.”

I think the secret to overcoming writer’s block is to look at what the blockage really means, in plain, unromantic language. And what it really means is probably one of the following:

“I don’t have a deadline for this particular writing project so I am not going to work on it right now.”

“I’m scared of writing so I’m not going to write right now.”

“I’m feeling lazy, so I’m not going to write right now.”

“That marble pound cake in the pantry is calling to me, so I’m not going to write right now.”

And so forth.

All of which are sort of valid excuses. But you should call them what they are.

Sometimes writing is a glorious, effortless gift from the muse. Sometimes it’s like doing squats, something you have to get through if you want some sort of result. You don’t get to choose which form writing is going to take at which time. You do, however, get to choose how to react when the writing feels like a painful physical workout. You can say “oh, I’ve got writer’s block” and give up. Or you can realize that nobody enjoys doing squats, or writing that feels like squats, and most of all, nobody enjoys starting to do squats. Since that’s the case, and since you won’t be able to get to the next glorious

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